Freud and Jung on the Shepherd of Hermas

Freud and Jung on the Shepherd of Hermas

The shepherd of Hermas is a mid-second century book reflecting the life of the early Christianity in Rome. For a time the book, written in the form of a dream, has been quoted and regarded as inspired. Beside its religious connotation, the book has increasingly taken as an academic angle in the field of psychological where it is used in the interpretation of dreams. Whereas theologians would see the dreams or the vision in the book as God inspired, psychologist tend to treat them as the expression of the unconscious. From the basis of the early scholars in the field of analytical psychology, the dream can have both a Freudian interpretation and a Jungian interpretation.

Pay to Unlock the Answer!



Overall, Jung and Freud contend that all dreams are related to the concerns, hopes and anxiety of everyday life. Hermas is concerned whether one day he will start a family and has unanswered question about the possibility of ever reuniting with his family. He has wishes and unfilled desires that are repressed to his unconscious mind only to be expressed in form of a dream. He has also not gone over the experiences of slavery and that is why in the building of the tower there are thousand of men working in the site. The dram, therefore, in psychoanalytic sense is an expression of repressed feelings.